For many people, hitting middle age is often accompanied by a noticeable drop in energy levels. If you find yourself feeling “tired and run down”, don’t worry, you’re not alone and there is something you can do about it. The first thing to do is see a health professional for a quick check up. While fatigue is associated with aging, it can also be the result of various health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease or even a food intolerance. However, if it is age related, here are a few tips that should help to put the bounce back in your step:
 
PAY ATTENTION TO WHAT YOU EAT AND DRINK:
Focus on eating a healthy, balanced diet with nutritious foods that boost your body’s energy levels naturally including plenty of vegetables, low-fat proteins and whole grains such as brown rice. Also try to eat smaller but more frequent meals – they’re easier for your body to convert to fuel. When it comes to snacks, avoid “junk food” and stick to fruits, yogurt, nuts and seeds. Also, dehydration causes fatigue so make sure you drink lots of water (the darker your urine, the more water you need).
 
GET UP, GET OUT & GET ACTIVE:
You may feel as though you’re too tired to exercise, but a quick workout can actually increase your energy levels. A brisk walk, for example, is enough to increase your heart rate and give you an energy boost. Try going for a walk at lunch to give yourself the energy you need to get through the afternoon. In general, you should aim for between 20 and 30 minutes of exercise daily (or around two and a half hours each week) in order to stay healthy and energized.
 
MOM WAS RIGHT…BETTER TAKE YOUR VITAMINS:
Getting enough vitamins and minerals in your diet is important. Not only will it increase your energy levels, will also keep your body functioning properly. In particular, B vitamins, iron, magnesium and zinc are important to keep you energized and ready to go. Try to get them from your diet whenever possible but if you’re unable to, consider supplements. Speak to your health care provider about which supplements your body could use. Vitamin D is also shown to boost energy but it doesn’t come from food. It’s manufactured by the skin after exposure to the sun. During the winter it can be tough to get enough sun so a Vitamin D supplements is usually a good idea.
 
GET A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP & TRY A POWER NAP:
We all know that sleep is directly related to energy levels. But how much sleep is enough? In general, the average adult needs between seven and eight hours of sleep each night. If possible, you should also try an afternoon power nap. Believe it or not, our bodies naturally seem to be designed for this as we tend to wind down in the afternoon. Just keep it to under 20 minutes so you don’t affect your night time sleep.
 
If you, or someone you know, is struggling with a lack of energy and need help with making any of these changes – or if you’ve tried these things and still feel exhausted, please don’t hesitate to let us know. Remember, at Physiomed, Healthier Starts Here!