3

Find A Clinic Near You

Walking in Nature

A Walk in Nature is its Own Form of Therapy

We all know the mental and physical benefits of exercise, but the gym doesn’t compare to the great outdoors. Walking in nature has been proven to alter the blood flow and activity in your brain, reducing stress and anxiety.

Poor arch support, injury, or biomechanical issues can make it difficult to exercise. Orthotics and foot care treatments help you to improve mobility so that you can strengthen your body and mind.

In Physiomed’s newest infographic, “How Walking in Nature Actually Changes Our Brains … for the Better,” we highlight the mental and physical benefits of this activity.

The Mental and Physical Benefits

Walking in nature can benefit your overall health.

Walking reduces sugar cravings, lowers the risk of breast cancer, provides arthritis and joint pain relief, and helps you live longer. Consumption of sugary foods regularly, leads to diabetes. Walking a few miles a day can save you the time spent later for looking around for type 2-diabetes treatment & cardiovascular disease treatment centres around the city if you were to be diagnosed with these life-threatening chronic ailments. When you walk in nature, you’re giving your immune system a boost and assisting your body in building anti-cancer cells.

This form of exercise can help you to not only live healthier but also happier. Walking has also been found to be one of the most cost-effective methods for weight control. Why not save some bucks rather than paying for those weight-reduction supplements?

A Stanford study found that walking in nature can decrease blood flow to your subgenual prefrontal cortex – the area of the brain often linked to mental illness. Participants who walk in nature saw a decrease in negative thoughts and improvements in cognitive function. In fact, the Journal of Physiological Anthropology found that just 20 minutes spent in nature can lead to a 13.4% drop in cortisol, your body’s primary stress hormone.

Nature Walks for City Dwellers

With more than half of the world’s population living in cities, many people find it difficult to participate in nature walks.

City-dwellers often experience increased stress, anxiety and depression, which can be alleviated through naturopathy treatment Toronto – and chronic stress can contribute to a slew of other health problems. However, this doesn’t mean people living in rural areas are happier.

Simply walking through a city isn’t the solution. Walking in nature offers significantly more mental, neurological and physical benefits compared to urban walking, according to recent research. The goal is to make time to be in nature, regardless of where you live.

Click on the following text to copy

 

Our Content

Want to learn more about the various factors affecting your health, including tips for making specific improvements? Check out the following samples from our blog or visits our archives for information on topics of particular relevance to you:

female lady healing from foot pain through orthotics

Heel spurs are growths of bone that appear on the bottom of your heels. READ MORE

Young Man Feeling Osteoporosis Pain at Home

Osteoporosis is a degenerative disease that weakens your bones and makes them porous due to the... READ MORE

Contrary to stereotypes, golf can be quite hard on your body, especially if you play frequently. READ MORE

Foot pain is something that we often ignore because we think it’s not a big deal. READ MORE

Join the Conversation

Receive Physiomed updates & tips, share your progress & experiences and hear about those of others by join us on social media.


  • 1 day ago

    Physiomed Health

    #MondayMotivation ...


  • 3 days ago

    Physiomed Health

    #SelfCareSunday ...


  • 4 days ago

    Physiomed Health

    If you’re looking for a stress relieving winter pastime with your family, then hiking in the midst of forests and valleys blanketed in snow will leave you feeling peaceful. #SocialSaturday #SocializeExercise ...


Something is wrong.
Instagram token error.
Load More